The Implementation of a Theoretical Model

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The implementation of a theoretical model in a medical facility requires the involvement of every staff member. The staff members, especially nurses, should be able to apply a care-oriented theoretical model in practice to improve one’s performance and be able to assist and guide colleagues. Despite the fact, that the implementation process results in the improvement of optimal patient and work environment-related outcomes, it is slow and challenging.

The process of implementing a theoretical model in a facility might be viewed as abstract and difficult. Changing this view is a challenge that every staff member must undergo in order to continue improving one’s performance and capabilities. According to Svanström et al. (2016), this process can be facilitated by proper supervision and reflection sessions, enabling the participants’ understanding and changing the approach to caring. Furthermore, the implementation needs encouragement since the changing process takes a long time and requires patience (Svanström et al., 2016). In the case of voluntary participation, the overall impact of such work might transpire less efficient and less sustainable (Svanström et al., 2016). As such, a theoretical model implementation in a facility is a complex process from the very beginning that requires time, patience, and supervision to result in changes and sustainable improvement.

Every staff member is responsible for the overall outcome of the implementation process. However, most cases count nursing leadership and project leads as the implementation facilitators. They have the authority to assist and encourage the implementation of a theoretical model into clinical practice through policy, procedure, and organizational changes (Speroni et al., 2020). As a result, they are usually capable of sharing and disseminating findings, engaging, and educating colleagues. These capabilities render nursing leadership and project leaders as a crucial element in a successful implementation process.

Since the process requires time and patience, sustaining the willingness of the staff to continue education and cooperation is vital. Making the staff members feel well-informed and involved in decision-making has the potential to ease the implementation (Svanström et al., 2016). A project’s failure to remain in a transparent atmosphere has a chance to raise questions, preventing the staff from further cooperation and education. Incompetent leadership and facilitation may lead to a staff’s refusal to change their habitual methods of working.

The education aspect of the theoretical model implementation in a facility can seem to be overwhelming and intense. It usually includes a variety of educational programs, certifications, specialty role-related competencies, educational conferences, and nurse residency programs (Speroni et al., 2020). However, this curriculum is usually prolonged for an extended amount of time. Under the right facilitator and supervisor, this curriculum is conducted without a serious negative impact on a staff member’s work routine and hours. The staff can be motivated to continue the learning activities of the implementation process by being provided with a detailed assessment and feedback.

The process of implementing a theoretical model is slow, during which, every staff member is educated in order to change the methods of work and care. The implementation process is very demanding of nurse leadership and project leads’ knowledge and expertise to guide and assist the staff. The process should remain transparent and cooperative to ensure the staff’s understanding to improve patient and work-environment-related outcomes. The support and feedback should be provided for the entire period to guarantee the sustainability of the changes.

References

Svanström, R., Andersson, S., Rosén, H., & Berglund M. (2016). Moving from theory to practice: Experience of implementing a learning supporting model designed to increase patient involvement and autonomy in care. BMC Research Notes, 9, 361.

Speroni, K. G., McLaughlin, M. K., & Friesen, M. A. (2020). Use of evidence‐based practice models and research findings in Magnet‐Designated hospitals across the United States: National survey results. Worldviews on Evidence‐Based Nursing, 17(2), 98-107.

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NursingBird. (2022, December 24). The Implementation of a Theoretical Model. Retrieved from https://nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/

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NursingBird. (2022, December 24). The Implementation of a Theoretical Model. https://nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/

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"The Implementation of a Theoretical Model." NursingBird, 24 Dec. 2022, nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/.

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NursingBird. (2022) 'The Implementation of a Theoretical Model'. 24 December.

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NursingBird. 2022. "The Implementation of a Theoretical Model." December 24, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/.

1. NursingBird. "The Implementation of a Theoretical Model." December 24, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/.


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NursingBird. "The Implementation of a Theoretical Model." December 24, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/the-implementation-of-a-theoretical-model/.