Miami-Dade County: Community Needs

Description of the Community

  • cardiovascular risk due to overweight (62%), sedentary lifestyle (30%), hypertension (33%), and smoking (PRC, 2013);
  • split from St. Johns County in 1836;
  • linked to the arrival of railroads in the 1890s, the construction of canals, and unrest in Latin America;
  • highly heterogeneous, including urban, suburban, and rural communities;
  • comprises over 35 cities, including the City of Miami;
  • over one million residents living in suburban regions;
  • having agricultural areas in the South (Cedar Lake Ventures, 2015).

General Identifying Data

  • lying in the Southeastern part of the Floridian peninsula;
  • having a maximum elevation of 10 ft above mean sea level (msl);
  • areas having a flat, low-lying topography; marshlands in the east and west;
  • a semi-tropical marine climate;
  • summer humidity – 89%, average rainfall – 1570 mm, diurnal temperature range -10oF.
  • a total landmass of over 2,000 square miles;
  • borders with the Atlantic Ocean, the Everglades National Park, Florida Keys, and Broward County (Cedar Lake Ventures, 2015).

Environment

  • drinking water supplied by the Water and Sewer Department;
  • methane, particulate matter, CO, and NO polluting air;
  • diverse fauna and flora, including prairie plant communities and scrubs;
  • moderate-to-good air quality index of up to 99%;
  • a vibrant agricultural sector, Cuban and Spanish cuisines;
  • prone to hurricanes, tropical storms, and the rising sea level;
  • residents are moving to evacuation centers during disasters (Grebmeier, 2014).

Housing, Industries, and Occupations

  • private houses and condominiums (built between1970 and 1979) ;
  • an adequate supply of multifamily homes, single-family houses, and mobile structures;
  • occupancy rate – 86%; owner-occupied – 60%, renter-occupied – 40%;
  • rental support to near-homeless residents; permanent structures for the homeless;
  • trade, transportation, and utilities, leisure, business services, and financial activities;
  • accountants, auditors, nurses, cargo agents, travel agents, construction workers (Cedar Lake Ventures, 2015).

People of the Community

  • a total population of 2,496,457 people;
  • 1,371 individuals per square mile;
  • growth by 8.2% since 2010;
  • over 87.6% living in the same house for over a year;
  • married (44.1%), single female (18.1%), single male (6%), one-person households (25.9%) (Florida Legislature, 2017).

Vital and Demographic Population Characteristics

  • 21.9% children and teens; 14.4% seniors; 5.6% college-aged, 58.5 % adults;
  • 68% Hispanic, 16% African American, 14% Caucasian, 2% Asian American;
  • annual birth rate of 11.76 per 1000 persons; death rate – 7.92;
  • 20.6 – diabetes mortality; 4.6 – infant mortality; 9.7 – maternal mortality;
  • heart disease – 5.5%, cancer – 5.3%, diabetes – 3% (PRC, 2013).

Psychological Considerations

  • the arrival of railroads (1896), Cuban immigration (the 1960s), Hurricane Andrew (1992);
  • future job growth of 37.9% in real estate and tourism industries;
  • 62% of adolescent suicides;
  • adequate government efforts to combat depression, domestic violence, and drug abuse;
  • unemployment, unaffordable housing, and legal problems as sources of stress (PRC, 2013).

Sociocultural and Political Considerations

  • residents speaking English, Spanish (72%), and Haitian Creole;
  • average income of $49,264 +/- $569 p.a.
  • the major occupations being accountants, auditors, nurses, and cargo agents;
  • employment rate – 5.4%, retired people – 14.4%, citizens in poverty – 20%;
  • 40.9% being religious: 22.5% Catholic, 1.15% Jewish, 5.95% other religions;
  • marriage and divorce rates – 7.4 and 4.3 per 1,000 people;
  • government including a mayor and board commissioners (PRC, 2013).

Education and Behavior Considerations

  • elementary (474), middle (215), senior high (105) schools, and a college;
  • the Teenage Parent program for pregnant teenagers to continue schooling;
  • mental health services and affordable homes for seniors;
  • Leisure Access Centers and Medicaid waiver for the disabled;
  • Blind Babies Program for toddlers and Miami Lighthouse for the elderly;
  • city recreational parks, libraries, and resorts (PRC, 2013).

Health System Considerations

  • many hospitals, community health centers, and mental facilities;
  • CHF, high blood pressure, and T2DM; uninsured population (18.3%);
  • essential healthcare, mental healthcare services, and maternal care available in hospitals;
  • lacking adequate culturally sensitive services in behavioral and mental health;
  • a large number of the uninsured;
  • Medicaid and Medicare programs for eligible persons.

References

Cedar Lake Ventures. (2015). Overview of Miami-Dade county, Florida. Web.

Florida Legislature. (2017). Miami-Dade county. Web.

Grebmeier, J. M., & Maslowski, W. (2014). The Pacific Arctic Region: ecosystem status and trends in a rapidly changing environment. Berlin, Germany: Springer.

Professional Research Consultants [PRC]. (2013). 2013 PRC Miami-Dade County community health needs assessment household survey report. Omaha, NE: PRC.