Information Systems for Evidence-Based Practice

From the perspective of evidence-based practice, information systems are invaluable. Indeed, they can be viewed as a part of the evidence-based practice since their introduction in nursing processes tends to enhance the latter, but it is also a source of valuable data, including nursing data (Westra et al., 2015). The latter fact means that they can be employed to provide data for future investigations that would generate evidence for improved practice.

At my workplace, the key information system that is used is electronic health records, and I have seen them being implemented on the basis of then-available evidence. Nowadays, they support our practice, which is, technically, evidence-based.

Regarding the material resources that are connected to information systems, it is difficult to determine which ones of them are most important (Rouleau et al., 2017). However, it appears that all the critical equipment is particularly significant for successful evidence-based practice due to its impact on the access to and functioning of information systems. DNP-prepared nurses need to play a part in the employment of information systems to the benefit of evidence-based practice because said systems are a major asset. Among other things, nurses can employ their leadership skills to foster communication on evidence-based practice and advocate for evidence-based practice improvement.

References

Hammatt, J., & Nies, M. (2015). DNP’s: What can we expect? Nurse Leader, 13(6), 64-67. Web.

Rouleau, G., Gagnon, M., Côté, J., Payne-Gagnon, J., Hudson, E., & Dubois, C. (2017). Impact of information and communication technologies on nursing care: Results of an Overview of Systematic Reviews. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(4), e122. Web.

Westra, B., Clancy, T., Sensmeier, J., Warren, J., Weaver, C., & Delaney, C. (2015). Nursing knowledge. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 39(4), 304-310. Web.