Evidence-Based Care in Intensive Treatment Unit

Why don’t we do evidenced-based nursing? Should physicians be involved in this initiative in an ICU?

Physicians should be involved in Evidence-Based Practice in an ICU. The main reason they should be involved is they need to have the most current information on how to save patients in very critical situations (Steelman, 2006). In fact, they need to be involved in this practice more than any other group of medical practitioners.

One nurse said, “I don’t want to do research. I became a nurse to practice nursing.” How should the nurse manager reply to this statement?

The nurse manager should answer the nurse in a way that will make him/her see how the adoption of the researching culture will help improve his/her skills and knowledge as a nurse (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2011). For example, the manager can tell him/her that if he/she wishes to offer better services and be recognized as a good nurse, then he/she needs to research and get more and current information about nursing (Steelman, 2006). In addition, the manager should let the nurse know that doing research does not prevent him/her from being a good nurse. On the contrary, it improves his/her services as a nurse.

How might the ICU unit design an initiative to focus on interprofessional EBP? What professions other than nurses and physicians should be involved in this initiative on an ICU?

Professions that should be involved in this initiative on an ICU are professional counselors, teachers and lecturers of medical schools and religious leaders. These professionals have knowledge that is relevant in helping nurses and physicians in the provision of the best care to their patients (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2011).

References

Melnyk, B. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2011). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Steelman, V. (2006). Evidence based practice. Philadelphia: Saunders.