Clinical Trials, Their Processes and Factors

A clinical trial refers to one of the types of a clinical study when participants receive a special intervention in accordance with a plan prepared by a researcher. The review of ClinicalTrials.gov website helps in understanding the notion of clinical trials as well as their processes, longevity, reasons, and participation details (“Learn about clinical studies,” 2017). Personally, I learned that clinical trials are usually conducted by a doctor or a team of experts, including nurses, doctors, and other health care providers. At the same time, it was exciting to learn about the reasons for initiating such studies. Along with the prevention of various diseases and identifying potentially risky conditions, it is possible to examine one or more interventions and discover some ways to advance supportive care. Some information regarding the eligibility for participation was also new to me. Even though I thought that there are some universal criteria, it turned out that every clinical trial has unique inclusion and exclusion factors, among which there can be age, gender, sex, ethnicity, and so on.

In my point of view, clinical trials are an appropriate method to study clinical conditions and improve them based on discussion and findings. The availability of information on such sources as National Institutes of Health (NIH), Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites is helpful to increase awareness of people who want to participate in clinical trials and also receive knowledge about their diseases (“Other sites about clinical studies,” 2017). In this connection, one may suggest that it is important to learn more about clinical trials by disseminating relevant information through web sources, scholarly literature, and patient education.

References

Learn about clinical studies. (2017). Web.

Other sites about clinical studies. (2017). Web.