Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths

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Introduction

Here, an analysis of the data collected for a Capstone project, which is dedicated to reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), will be presented. The project involves investigating the effectiveness of 2% chlorhexidine washcloths in preventing CAUTIs, and it uses a pre-test post-test design. The site’s nursing team was provided with the training necessary to prevent CAUTI and apply the washcloths correctly. The project is in progress, which is why the post-test data for the patients and CAUTIs cannot be provided yet. However, the data that describe the staff’s demographics and pre-and post-training scores can already be obtained. Here, descriptive and inferential statistics will be used to analyze the data and make conclusions about the sample and training.

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Data Preparation

The demographic data of the participants, as well as their pre-and post-training CAUTI prevention scores, have already been collected. The project used a Likert-scale tool (Appendix A). The scores were computed based on the number of correct answers before and after the training; together with the demographic data, all the information was placed into an Excel datasheet. To prepare the data for the analysis, all the entries were manually checked to ensure the absence of mistakes and impossible codes; manual checking is a typical solution to this task (Polit & Beck, 2017). The scores were transferred to an SPSS file as well.

Data Analysis

Demographic Data Analysis

The demographic data need to be reported to describe the sample. Percentages and graphs were employed to represent the information in detail and visually. Microsoft Excel was used for creating the figures. As can be seen from Figure 1, 26 people were recruited; 100% of them were female. Exactly 50% of the sample consisted of nurses; the rest were nursing assistants (see Figure 1).

 A pie chart of the participants’ data
Figure 1. A pie chart of the participants’ data

Most participants were older than 30 (see Figure 2). Only six people (approximately 23% of the sample) were younger; nine of the participants (33%) were aged between 31 and 40, and six more people (roughly 22%) reported being between 41 and 50 years old. Also, five people were older than 51 but younger than 60, and one participant was older than that.

A pie chart of the participants’ age data
Figure 2. A pie chart of the participants’ age data

Figure 3 demonstrates that most participants had six years of experience or more; only three of them (a little over 11%) reported having the working experience of one year, and six of them (around 23%) had been working for two-to-five years. Nine people (roughly 35%) had worked for more than six years but less than ten years and the rest of the participants (31%) had experience of over ten years of work. To summarize, the sample included female nurses and nursing assistants, and the majority of them were older than 30 and rather experienced.

A pie chart of the participants’ experience data
Figure 3. A pie chart of the participants’ experience data

Statistical Analysis: Testing for Relationships

The goal of this analysis is to determine if any relationship between the independent (intervention) and dependent (survey score) variables can be found. The project used only one group, and the final scores of the participants are represented through continuous data, which means that the paired t-test should theoretically be applicable (Polit & Beck, 2017; Richardson-Tench, Nicholson, Taylor, & Kermode, 2018). However, a t-test can only be used if several assumptions can be made, and that includes the assumption of normal distribution (Polit & Beck, 2017). The score’s histograms, which can be found in Figures 1 and 2, show that the scores are not normally distributed. In other words, the t-test cannot be applied to these data; instead, as indicated by Polit and Beck (2017), it is necessary to use the Wilcoxon signed ranks test.

A histogram of the pre-test survey scores of the participants
Figure 4. A histogram of the pre-test survey scores of the participants
A histogram of the post-test survey scores of the participants
Figure 5. A histogram of the post-test survey scores of the participants

Inferential test: The program SPSS Statistics was employed for inferential testing in this project. Table 1 details the results of the Wilcoxon signed ranks test with a confidence interval of 95%. The significance is below the initially established level of 0.05 (p=0.04), which means that a statistically significant difference has been proven to exist between the two samples (Polit & Beck, 2017; Richardson-Tench et al., 2018). Consequently, it can be assumed that the tested intervention had an impact on the participants’ scores, which measure the team’s ability to prevent CAUTI and apply the 2% chlorhexidine washcloths. Therefore, the statistical analysis indicates that after their training, the participants became better qualified to take care of patients and utilize the washcloths.

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Table 1: Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test for the CAUTI Nurse Survey Results

Post – Pre
Z -2.909b
Asymp. Sig. (2-tailed) .004
a. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test
b. Based on negative ranks.

Conclusion

Currently, only the data regarding the participants’ demographics and CAUTI prevention scores can be obtained. The analysis demonstrates that out of the 26 participants (13 nurses and 13 certified nursing assistants), all were female; most of them were also relatively experienced and over the age of 30. Their CAUTI prevention scores required the application of the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. According to the results, the training was successful in enhancing the participants’ ability to prevent CAUTI. Thus, the appropriate application of descriptive and inferential statistics allowed summarizing the data and using the results to make inferences about the intervention and its impact on the participants’ performance.

References

Polit, D.F., & Beck, C.T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice (10th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Richardson-Tench, M., Nicholson, P., Taylor, B., & Kermode, S. (2018). Research in nursing, midwifery and allied health: Evidence for best practice (6th ed.). New York, NY: Cengage AU.

Appendix A

Data Collection Tool (Self-Assessment)

Demographic Characteristics (circle)
Gender Age Category
Male Female 18-30
Employment role 31-40
Nurse 41-50
CNA 51-60
PCT 61-70
Experience 1 year or < 2-5 years, 6-10 years >10 years
Response Key (Circle Response to each question/statement below)
1. Strongly agree 2. Agree 3. Neither agree
Nor disagree
4. Disagree 5. Strongly
disagree
6. Do not know
Long-term use of Urinary catheters, such as Foley or suprapubic is appropriate for the following conditions:
Urinary retention that cannot be managed by intermittent catheterization

1 2 3 4 5 6

Large pressure ulcers

1 2 3 4 5 6

Terminal illness that makes bed clothing changes uncomfortable for the resident

1 2 3 4 5 6

The following questions concern personal hygiene when caring for residents with indwelling urinary catheters:
I cleanse my hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub before urinary catheter manipulation

1 2 3 4 5 6

It is not necessary to cleanse hands after casual contact, such as taking pulse or adjusting their position with residents with urinary catheter

1 2 3 4 5 6

If my hands are not soiled, hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub is adequate after manipulation of catheter site

1 2 3 4 5 6

It is not necessary to wash my hands with soap and water after removing gloves

1 2 3 4 5 6

Gloves must be worn when caring for residents with indwelling urinary catheter

1 2 3 4 5 6

The following measures should be taken for care of residents with indwelling urinary catheter:
Area around urinary catheter cleansed at least once a day

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter should be changed once a month

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter and its bag can be temporarily disconnected

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter should be irrigated once per week

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter can be inserted for nursing staff convenience

1 2 3 4 5 6

CAUTI is not a very serious illness

1 2 3 4 5 6

Education regarding basic catheter care helps prevent CAUTI

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter care is done in a one-way manner from the meatus to the connection to the drainage bag

1 2 3 4 5 6

Catheter should be removed whenever it is convenient for hospital care professionals

1 2 3 4 5 6

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NursingBird. (2022, June 9). Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths. Retrieved from https://nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/

Reference

NursingBird. (2022, June 9). Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths. https://nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/

Work Cited

"Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths." NursingBird, 9 June 2022, nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/.

References

NursingBird. (2022) 'Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths'. 9 June.

References

NursingBird. 2022. "Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths." June 9, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/.

1. NursingBird. "Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths." June 9, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/.


Bibliography


NursingBird. "Reducing CAUTI with 2% Chlorhexidine Washcloths." June 9, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/reducing-cauti-with-2-chlorhexidine-washcloths/.