Major Nursing Theories and Personal Philosophy

Introduction

Some occupations such as nursing involve work with other people and this is why it is important for these specialists to have a clear vision of their goals and most appropriate methods of work. In this paper, I describe my own philosophy of nursing that I am going to apply during further practice.

There are a few factors that may influence the development of the philosophy of healthcare specialists. To begin with, instructors’ personal views and healthcare situations in a certain region may leave an imprint on the philosophy of a future specialist. What is more, it may be influenced by a specific positive or negative working experience or by famous nursing theorists.

Main body

Personally, I believe that the entire process of treatment should be planned in accordance with the client’s needs. To be more precise, I believe that the main goals of a nurse are to provide the patients with the necessary care and teach them how to take care of themselves as well because independence helps people to recover. As for the environment, I suppose that relationships between patients and their relatives are especially significant as the lack of support may negatively influence people’s health. Furthermore, if we speak about the third component of the nursing metaparadigm such as health, I am sure that patients’ physical health is not the only factor that should be paid attention to; besides, it is important to take all the measures to secure emotional well-being of the patient. I think so because the connection between body and mind should not be underestimated. As for the nursing component, I am convinced that it is extremely important for the specialist to be able to take into account previous experience gained with the help of similar cases. At the same time, the specialist should be able to develop a strategy keeping in mind special features related to the case.

Thinking about particular opinions of the researchers that correspond to my personal assumptions and priorities most of all, I can distinguish two famous nursing theories. First, I really like the ideas proposed by Dorothea Orem (O’Shaughnessy, 2014). According to her, the lack of self-care is a factor that prevents many patients from faster rehabilitation. Besides, she supposes that creating the conditions allowing the patients to be more self-supporting when it comes to healthcare is one of the most important tasks that should be performed by nurses. Orem supposes that an ability to care about themselves is a factor that is extremely important for all the patients. As for me, I share her point of view because it follows from my personal experience that patients try to do their best to avoid feeling helpless. Furthermore, I strongly believe that it is the lack of self-care that makes treatment slower and less effective. To continue, I also appreciate the ideas expressed by Nola Pender in her theory defining the principles of health promotion (Sousa, Gaspar, Vaz, Gonzaga, & Dixe, 2015). According to her, it is the primary goal of any specialist in nursing to promote a healthy lifestyle among the patients. Personally, I believe that this opinion is reasonable and any good specialist should encourage clients to make decisions helping to improve their health even after the end of treatment.

Conclusion

In the end, nursing philosophy may play an important part in specialists’ practice as it defines their primary values related to the field. My personal philosophy is a combination of principles connected to my previous experience and two famous nursing theories by Orem and Pender and I hope that these principles will help me to become a good specialist.

References

O’Shaughnessy, M. (2014). Application of Dorothea Orem’s theory of self-care to the elderly patient on peritoneal dialysis. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 41(5), 495.

Sousa, P., Gaspar, P., Vaz, D. C., Gonzaga, S., & Dixe, M. A. (2015). Measuring health-promoting behaviors: Cross-cultural validation of the health-promoting lifestyle profile. International Journal of Nursing Knowledge, 26(2), 54-61.