Asthma: Pediatric Treatment Recommendations

Do you recommend limited or involved the use of antibiotics in the treatment of these diseases and other unconfirmed bacterial illnesses and why?

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Diseases of this kind could be considered an extremely complex health issue that demands efficient intervention to eliminate bacteria that causes the development of a problem. For this reason, the use of antibiotics becomes fundamental for such cases. However, it is better to avoid an involved use of antibiotics and give preference to a limited one (Gbaguidi-Haore et al., 2013). The fact is that the prolonged use of the same drugs to treat an infectious disease could result in the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria characterized by the increased ability to resist prescribed medicines (CDC, 2013). Under these conditions, limited use of antibiotics regarding the peculiarities of the case could be recommended.

What are the standards regarding the use of antibiotics in the pediatric population, and what assessment findings would warrant prescribing an antibiotic for Asthma symptoms?

Regarding the tendency towards a more careful use of antibiotics because of the appearance of resistant bacteria, there are specific standards for the prescription of this kind of drug in a pediatric population. First, if the presence of a bacterial infection is determined, a specialist can start using antibiotics (CDC, 2017). Second, antibiotics could be prescribed if the state of a patient continues to worsen and if the benefits of their use overweigh harms (“American Academy of Pediatrics advises,” 2013). Third, only drugs that can eliminate the organism causing infection could be used. As for Asthma, symptoms severity and the overall state of a patient could justify the use of antibiotics to improve his/her state and attain positive outcomes.

Using national guidelines and evidence-based literature, develop an Asthma Action Plan for this patient.

  • Green Zone
  • Breathing is good
  • Wheeze less than 5 times a week
  • Normal activity
  • Use controller medicine
  • Albuterol inhaler, take 2 puffs a day
  • Yellow Zone
  • Cough, wheeze
  • Cannot do some usual activities
  • Problems with sleep because of asthma
  • Use quick-relief medicine every four hours until better
  • Salbutamol 2 puffs
  • Red Zone
  • Short of breath
  • Cannot do usual activities
  • Symptoms get worse
  • Call the doctor
  • Continue using quick-relief medicine

Do the etiology, diagnosis, and management of a child who is wheezing vary according to the child’s age? Why or why not?

Diagnosing children, it is crucial to consider their age as this factor impacts the majority of processes that happen in their bodies. As for wheezing, if a child is younger than five years, asthma becomes the most probable diagnosis (Daines & McMurray, 2016). However, for older children, the situation becomes more complex, and numerous causes might result in the development of wheezing: asthma, allergies, GERD, infections, and obstructive sleep apnea (MacReady & Barclay, 2013). Under these conditions, age becomes a fundamental factor when determining the primary reason for the occurrence of this very health problem and its further development.

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Which objective of the clinical findings will guide your diagnosis? Why?

First of all, it is fundamental to determine the type of bacteria that causes a particular health problem and results in the deterioration of the state of a patient. The fact is that the choice of medication and further treatment depends on the infectious organism that is presented in the body of a patient (Hay et al., 2016). Additionally, it is impossible to prescribe antibiotics if a bacteria or organism is not determined. That is why it is essential to examine a patient and his/her state to find a cause of the problem and eliminate it.

When is a chest x-ray indicated in this case?

A chest x-ray remains a powerful tool that helps therapists to find a particular health problem and initiate appropriate treatment. It could be used in case a patient still has wheezing or other complications. Additionally, a chest x-ray could be used as an initial diagnostic tool to prove the case of bronchial asthma and detect problematic areas. (Daines & McMurray, 2016). Therefore, bronchial thickening, hyperinflation, and focal atelectasis could evidence of the disease. Under these conditions, chest radiographic imaging could be used at the initial stage of the disease to either prove or refute the final diagnosis.

References

American Academy of Pediatrics advises physicians to use antibiotics judiciously. (2013). Web.

CDC. (2013). Antibiotic resistance threats in the US. Web.

CDC. (2017). Pediatric treatment recommendations. Web.

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Daines, L., & McMurray, A. (2016). Asthma in children. InnovAiT, 10(1), 5-14. Web.

Gbaguidi-Haore, H., Dumartin, C., L’Hériteau, F., Péfau, M., Hocquet, D., Rogues, A., & Bertrand, X. (2013). Antibiotics involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a nationwide multilevel study suggests differences within antibiotic classes. The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 68(2), 461-170. Web.

Hay, A., Redmond, N., Turnbull, S., Christensen, H., Thronton, H., Little, P.,… Blair, P. (2016). Development and internal validation of a clinical rule to improve antibiotic use in children presenting to primary care with acute respiratory tract infection and cough: a prognostic cohort study. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, 4(11), 902-910. Web.

MacReady, N., & Barclay, L. (2013). When are antibiotics needed for URI in children? Medscape. Web.

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