Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions

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Introduction

In the wake of changing lifestyles, many people have suffered from dementia-related conditions. The Alzheimer’s disease results in loss of memory that interferes with the patient’s daily activities. The disease was first discovered in 1907. Current statistics indicate that it accounts for about 70-percent of world’s dementia-related problems. Researchers have also noted that the disease mostly is primarily caused by death of brain cells. It can be acquired through inheritance or certain lifestyles that expose the individual to brain damage. This research proposal provides an insight into the relationship between the lifestyle of an individual and development of the Alzheimer’s disease.

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Background and Significance of the Problem

The proposal seeks to establish the relationship between the development of the Alzheimer’s disease and lifestyle of the patient. Researchers have not adequately defined the conditions that cause the disease. However, they have acknowledged that it is common amongst the elderly people. Recent studies indicate that the disease also affects a sizeable number of middle-aged individuals. Therefore, the development of the disease needs more research on issues that pertain to prevention and provision of proper medication (Can Alzheimer’s disease be prevented, 2009).

Statement of the Problem and Research Purpose

Living environments and lifestyles dictate the healthiness of individuals. A number of diseases are beyond genetic inheritance and can be amplified by prevailing lifestyle and environmental factors. Numerous scientists attest that the causes that are related to stroke, heart attacks, obesity, and blood pressure among others can influence the development of the Alzheimer’s disease. The condition majorly occurs in the human brain. Therefore, prolonged exposure to certain lifestyle and environmental factors that cause brain exhaustion such as depression, stress, and over-eating among others can also heighten the progression of the disease (Lindsay et al., 2002).

According to Lindsay et al. (2002), vascular diseases such as stroke and diabetes type 2 among others can have adverse effects on the brain tissues. This situation results in development of the Alzheimer’s disease. High blood pressure also has some negative effects on the brain cells. Such cases result in progression of the Alzheimer’s disease (Lindsay et al., 2002). New evidences of metabolism syndromes that are related to diabetes and obesity among others have also heightened researches on the progression of the condition in individuals. The syndromes develop various brain complications that cause cognitive imbalance (Allen, Frier, & Strachan, 2004). Other lifestyles that underpin the development of the Alzheimer’s disease are education and smoking. Many researchers posit that people with lower education and smokers face an increased risk of developing the disease (Scarmeas, Albert, Manly, & Stan, 2006).

However, numerous studies have also revealed that physical activities together with proper dieting promote good health. Individuals who are fond of socializing by maintaining cordial interactions with family, friends, and workmates among others mostly lead a stress-free life as compared to those individuals who are independent and withdrawn. Enhancing interactions can reduce stress, depression, and lonesomeness. Exercise enables an individual to build muscle strength. This situation improves the functioning of body organs such as the heart. As a result, it stimulates the burning of excess fats (Scarmeas et al., 2006).

The abovementioned information indicates that a relationship exists between the Alzheimer’s disease and lifestyle of the patient (Scarmeas et al., 2006). Although such evidence is available, there is minimal sensitization of individuals to the various lifestyles that augment the development of the condition. In addition, people who are aware of such information are not familiar with the best ways that should be followed to lead a healthy lifestyle. As a result, there is a misunderstanding of the link between the lifestyle and development of the Alzheimer’s disease (Lindsay et al., 2002). The proposed study will provide an insight into the association of the Alzheimer’s disease with the lifestyle of an individual that promote the development of the condition.

Research Question

Does change in lifestyle such as physical activities, socialization, and healthy dieting reduce the chances of developing and progression of Alzheimer’s disease?

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Hypothesis

H0: Change in lifestyle factors that include socialization, physical activities, and healthy dieting do not delay development of the Alzheimer’s disease.

H1: Change in lifestyle factors that include socialization, physical activities, and healthy dieting delay development of the Alzheimer’s disease.

Variables

The study will entail measurement of both independent variables and dependent variables such as the type of diets, interactions, and physical activities.

Operational Definition of Terms

  • Alzheimer’s disease is a disorder that is caused by the death of brain cells, a situation that results in memory impairment (Scarmeas et al., 2006).
  • Healthy dieting refers to consumption of balanced nourishment that promotes the healthiness of an individual by providing the necessary nutrients to the body (Scarmeas et al., 2006).
  • Diabetes type 2 is a metabolic disorder that is caused by inability of the body to regulate high amounts of blood sugar (Allen et al., 2004).
  • Vascular disease is a condition that leads to heart failure and development of problems in the circulatory system (Allen et al., 2004).

Reference List

Allen, K.V., Frier, B.M., & Strachan, M.W. (2004). The relationship between type 2 diabetes and cognitive dysfunction: longitudinal studies and their methodological limitations. European journal of pharmacology, 490(1), 169-75.

Can Alzheimer’s disease be prevented? (2009). Journal of Practical Nursing, 59(2), 8-13.

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Lindsay, J., Laurin, D., Verreault, R., Hébert, R., Helliwell, B., Hill, G.,…McDowell, I. (2002). Risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease: a prospective analysis from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging. American Journal of Epidemiology, 156(5), 445-53.

Scarmeas, N., Albert, S., Manly, J., & Stan, Y. (2006). Education and rates of cognitive decline in incident Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & psychiatry, 77(3), 308-16.

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NursingBird. (2022, March 27). Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions. Retrieved from https://nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/

Reference

NursingBird. (2022, March 27). Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions. https://nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/

Work Cited

"Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions." NursingBird, 27 Mar. 2022, nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/.

References

NursingBird. (2022) 'Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions'. 27 March.

References

NursingBird. 2022. "Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions." March 27, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/.

1. NursingBird. "Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions." March 27, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/.


Bibliography


NursingBird. "Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia-Related Conditions." March 27, 2022. https://nursingbird.com/alzheimers-disease-dementia-related-conditions/.